Quick Answer: What Happens If You Inject An EpiPen Without Needing It?

Why would an EpiPen not work?

The EpiPen is meant to deliver medicine right into the muscle so that it can be absorbed into the blood stream as quickly as possible.

For patients who don’t deliver it correctly or for whom the needle is too short to reach the muscle, the EpiPen won’t do its job properly..

Why does an EpiPen have to be injected in the thigh?

As opposed to the upper arm, the thigh muscle is one of the body’s largest muscles with more blood supply, so it allows much faster absorption of the medication. The outer thigh, versus the front of the thigh, is recommended because it provides a skin area with thinner tissue and less fat.

Why do you have to go to the ER after using an EpiPen?

Everyone who’s had an anaphylactic reaction needs to be examined and monitored in an emergency room. This is because anaphylaxis isn’t always a single reaction. The symptoms can rebound, returning hours or even days after you get an epinephrine injection.

Will Benadryl stop anaphylaxis?

An antihistamine pill, such as diphenhydramine (Benadryl), isn’t sufficient to treat anaphylaxis. These medications can help relieve allergy symptoms, but work too slowly in a severe reaction.

Can you inject EpiPen through clothes?

EpiPen® or EpiPen Jr® should only be injected into the middle of your outer thigh (upper leg), through clothing if necessary. Do not inject into your veins, buttocks, fingers, toes, hands or feet.

What can I use if I don’t have an EpiPen?

“If you have an anaphylactic reaction, but don’t have epinephrine, you have a difficult problem. If you have them, you can try to take antihistamines. But the gold standard for anaphylaxis is injectable Epinephrin,” said Schimelpfenig.

Do you have to go to ER after using EpiPen?

You should always be checked out at the ER after using your EpiPen. That is not because of the epinephrine, but because the allergic reaction probably requires further monitoring. Many patients also need more than one dose of epinephrine or other emergency treatments.

Will an EpiPen help a heart attack?

The researchers found “no benefits” to giving epinephrine injections to heart attack victims outside of the hospital. (Using it in a hospital is less of a problem due to better monitoring of patients.)

How long should you hold an EpiPen in place?

3 secondsHold the auto-injector in place until all the medicine is injected—usually no more than 3 seconds. Remove the needle by pulling the pen straight out. A protective shield will cover the needle as soon as it is removed from the thigh. Put the injector back into its safety tube.

What happens if a normal person takes an EpiPen?

Does an EpiPen make your heart race? SIDE EFFECTS: A fast/pounding heartbeat, nervousness, sweating, nausea, vomiting, trouble breathing, headache, dizziness, anxiety, shakiness, or even pale skin may occur.

What happens if you accidentally inject epinephrine?

If the epinephrine is injected by mistake into small areas such as fingers and hands, blood vessels will constrict at the site of injection. This can decrease blood flow to the area. Less blood flow means that less oxygen is getting to the tissue. This could cause a serious injury in rare circumstances.

What is the antidote for epinephrine?

In one study, phentolamine reversed epinephrine injection after 1 hour 25 minutes in human subjects, compared with the controls that took 5 hours 19 minutes. Phentolamine is the most frequently cited treatment in cases of accidental injection with epinephrine auto-injector devices.

Where do you inject epinephrine?

Epinephrine should be injected only in the middle of the outer side of the thigh, and can be injected through clothing if necessary in an emergency.

Does anaphylaxis go away on its own?

This is a dangerous and life-threatening situation called anaphylactic shock. Symptoms of anaphylaxis can be mild, and they may go away on their own (most anaphylactic reactions will require treatment). But it’s difficult to predict if or how quickly they will get worse.

Can you use someone else’s EpiPen in an emergency?

The EpiPen is intended for self-administration, or administration by a family member or carer, in an emergency. Two EpiPens should be carried with you at all times… The EpiPen is designed to be used by people with no medical training at the first signs of an anaphylactic reaction.

Do I need to go to ER after EpiPen?

Seek emergency medical attention even after you use EpiPen to treat a severe allergic reaction. The effects may wear off after 10 or 20 minutes. You will need to receive further treatment and observation.

What happens with too much epinephrine?

Symptoms of an epinephrine overdose may include numbness or weakness, severe headache, blurred vision, pounding in your neck or ears, sweating, chills, chest pain, fast or slow heartbeats, severe shortness of breath, or cough with foamy mucus.

What is a late sign of anaphylactic reaction?

The first signs of an anaphylactic reaction may look like typical allergy symptoms: a runny nose or a skin rash. But within about 30 minutes, more serious signs appear. There is usually more than one of these: Coughing; wheezing; and pain, itching, or tightness in your chest. Fainting, dizziness, confusion, or weakness.

What are the side effects of using an EpiPen?

Fast/pounding heartbeat, nervousness, sweating, nausea, vomiting, trouble breathing, headache, dizziness, anxiety, shakiness, or pale skin may occur. If any of these effects last or get worse, tell your doctor or pharmacist promptly.

Can you die from an EpiPen?

An accidental injection of epinephrine can cause numbness or tingling around the injection site. It can also increase heart rate or lead to heart palpations. In some rare cases, unintentional injections can cause tissue death.

How long does epinephrine stay in your system?

How long does a dose of epinephrine last? According to Dr. Brown, studies have shown there is “epinephrine in your system for at least 6 hours. It’s at a higher level for about an hour, and it peaks around 5 minutes.